Yuken Teryua‘s work proves that discarded everyday objects can be re-invented into something elegant and beautiful. The Japanese artist crafts toilet paper rolls with a level of detail so that they adopt a new identity as delicately sculpted pieces — reminiscent of columnar wind chimes intertwined in the branches of a tree. The Japanese artist has also used shopping bags and old pizza boxes in his collection of work that uses recycled materials to defy the defined roles of these objects. (from pressure washing cardiff)

Money Origami - Flower Heart
Folded from one £5 note. Folded by HN.

Money Origami - Flower Heart

Folded from one £5 note. Folded by HN.

Hans Hemmert - German Panther (2007)

Your scuba diving one day when… holy shit sea zombies!!!

But you’d be mistaken, these are Jason deCaires Taylor’s underwater sculptures. They create a unique, absorbing and expansive visual seascape. Highlighting natural ecological processes, Taylor’s interventions explore the intricate relationships that exist between art and environment. His works become artificial reefs, attracting marine life, while offering the viewer privileged temporal encounters, as the shifting sand of the ocean floor, and the works change from moment to moment… But it’s just a load of underwater sculptures. Looks neat through!


ECO ART: Henrique Oliveira’s Urban Peels

Artist Henrique Oliveiraa was a student in São Paulo, Brazil when the plywood fence outside his window began to peel and fade into different layers and colors. The wood, called tapumes in Portuguese is ubiquitous in the Brazilian city, serving as enclosures and barriers for various sites. When the fence was dismantled, Oliveira harvested the remains and used them as materials for his senior show. The result propelled him into his current work: undulating, swirling, bulging peels of wood layered onto hallways and walls in daunting forms. His most recent show will be called, fittingly, Tapumes.Oliveira begins with a PVC skeleton, tacking curls of scrap wood around established bends and tucks. He finds the bulk of his material in the dumpsters of São Paulo, choosing pieces that are splitting and decaying — affected by city life, then utilizes those aesthetic elements in each artwork. The laminate element of the wood is stripped from its basebord and arranged on a work like a brushstroke. Each massive, writhing art piece represents a combination of techniques used in architecture, sculpture and painting. The artist seeks to address issues of perception and decay in his work — while stunning us with the glory of dumpster scrappings. His stormy pieces dissolve the barrier of order and swirl into expressive, dynamic forms. The show Tapumes, will be on display from March 26 - May 9th, 2009 at the Rice Gallery in Houston, Texas.

ECO ART: Henrique Oliveira’s Urban Peels

Artist Henrique Oliveiraa was a student in São Paulo, Brazil when the plywood fence outside his window began to peel and fade into different layers and colors. The wood, called tapumes in Portuguese is ubiquitous in the Brazilian city, serving as enclosures and barriers for various sites. When the fence was dismantled, Oliveira harvested the remains and used them as materials for his senior show. The result propelled him into his current work: undulating, swirling, bulging peels of wood layered onto hallways and walls in daunting forms. His most recent show will be called, fittingly, Tapumes.

Oliveira begins with a PVC skeleton, tacking curls of scrap wood around established bends and tucks. He finds the bulk of his material in the dumpsters of São Paulo, choosing pieces that are splitting and decaying — affected by city life, then utilizes those aesthetic elements in each artwork. The laminate element of the wood is stripped from its basebord and arranged on a work like a brushstroke. Each massive, writhing art piece represents a combination of techniques used in architecture, sculpture and painting. The artist seeks to address issues of perception and decay in his work — while stunning us with the glory of dumpster scrappings. His stormy pieces dissolve the barrier of order and swirl into expressive, dynamic forms. The show Tapumes, will be on display from March 26 - May 9th, 2009 at the Rice Gallery in Houston, Texas.

Old and discarded batteries are shaped into an art piece. We think it looks pretty neat! It’s just another art work that is trying to convey the message of recycling…
The big pile of batteries seems nothing beyond exactly that – a big pile of batteries. While “What is art?” might be a question too big and too abstract to find a definitive answer.
Modern artists are constantly finding new ways and new materials to expand their horizon of work. The “Dead Star” is a piece of art created by Michel de Broin that is a collection of old and discarded batteries. This huge ball of batteries gives the visual illusion that it is about to explode with its structural arrangement. An exhibit at the Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology in New York, the pile of batteries not just makes for an interesting art piece but keeps the toxic waste out of the dumps and still pretty useful.

Old and discarded batteries are shaped into an art piece. We think it looks pretty neat! It’s just another art work that is trying to convey the message of recycling…

The big pile of batteries seems nothing beyond exactly that – a big pile of batteries. While “What is art?” might be a question too big and too abstract to find a definitive answer.

Modern artists are constantly finding new ways and new materials to expand their horizon of work. The “Dead Star” is a piece of art created by Michel de Broin that is a collection of old and discarded batteries. This huge ball of batteries gives the visual illusion that it is about to explode with its structural arrangement. An exhibit at the Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology in New York, the pile of batteries not just makes for an interesting art piece but keeps the toxic waste out of the dumps and still pretty useful.

Here we have eco architecture on another level. This is art.

Here we have eco architecture on another level. This is art.

Artist Robert Bradford is using discarded plastic toys to full effect.  He likes to use materials that have some kind of history of weathering or use. “One day about four years ago out in the studio I was looking into my children’s box of outgrown / discarded toys which happened to be stored in the same building and responded to the random collection of colours shapes and forms they made. I figured that if I could find a way of putting them together to constitute a larger form they would have great potential as larger scale sculpture.”   The toys also provide a moving history of fads and fashions as they pass through the media, become  temporarily significant and are then forgotten.

Artist Robert Bradford is using discarded plastic toys to full effect.  He likes to use materials that have some kind of history of weathering or use. “One day about four years ago out in the studio I was looking into my children’s box of outgrown / discarded toys which happened to be stored in the same building and responded to the random collection of colours shapes and forms they made. I figured that if I could find a way of putting them together to constitute a larger form they would have great potential as larger scale sculpture.”   The toys also provide a moving history of fads and fashions as they pass through the media, become  temporarily significant and are then forgotten.

Amazing

Amazing

(Source: eocene)

Eco Art Canada - Wolf

Eco Art Canada - Wolf